Day 14: Perth – Fremantle – Perth (Part 1)

After taking the Blue Cat bus to esplanade Busport, we walked into town to find a camera store before making our way to Perth station to catch a train to Fremantle.

The trip took about half an hour and cost us $4 each (one way). On arrival in Fremantle, we decided to catch the free Blue Cat bus to get an idea of the area and points of interest. It was hard for us to find the correct bus stop but we asked for assistance and it wasn’t long before the bus arrived.

Fremantle is proud of its heritage buildings and while many have changed from their original use, some still have beautiful period features, like this shop we passed.
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In the 1950s and 1960s, many of the verandahs on the buildings were removed as they were considered “unsightly” and were replaced by cantilevered awnings; thankfully people have come to realise the value of the old architecture and the verandas are being replaced on many of the buildings. Here are just some of the interesting buildings we saw as we walked towards and through the “cappuccino strip”.
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The markets are opened from Friday to Sunday, and on public holiday Mondays. We were there on a Thursday so missed out on seeing what is apparently a very lively sight.
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These former warders’ cottages (for the nearly prison) are currently unfit for habituation but negotiation is going on between the Department of Housing and the National Trust of Australia to renovate them and make them available to ease the housing shortage.
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This is the now disused police station (they’ve moved to larger, more modern premises)
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And this one facade of the Town Hall building.
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We spent some time inside St John the Evangelist (Anglican) church, which is the second church of the same name built on more-or-less the same site – the previous one was too small and when the parish planned to extend the local government knocked it down to put a road through! While inside, we were fortunate enough to hear the organist warming up before an organ recital scheduled for an hour later.
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This modern window is very different to the old stained glass windows.
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Fremantle Prison, which was in use until 1991, is a huge complex listed on the World Heritage List. We did not have time to view it properly but we did look at the buildings on the outside.
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When we return to Fremantle (after retirement), we’d like to stay in one of these three cottages which are now available for short-term lease as self-contained holiday cottages.
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This is the surgeon’s house which shows the esteem with which doctors were held in the nineteenth century, it is even larger than the superindent’s house!
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These last two photos are of a Presbyterian church; much less ornate that the Anglican or Catholic Churches of the same era. We noticed that it doesn’t have a central aisle, but a large block of pews in the centre, flanked by two smaller blocks of pews, one on either side.
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